Alzheimer's Second Opinion

Mark Goodman, Ph.D., M.A. is a Behavioral Medicine/Neuropsychologist with extensive training, research, experience in Geriatric Neuropsychology Dementia Assessment.

Over and over again in my practice, I have found that people have been misdiagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease.  Frequently, more than 80% of the time, I have found they have medical conditions which can be easily treated and result in remarkable improvement in their mental/memory function.

 
Helpful Information
Biography
Results History
Published Research

Helpful Information

One such test I've modified non-invasively identifies mis-diagnosed Alzheimer's due to vitamin B12 deficiency despite normal blood levels of vitamin B12 (published).
Another rapid non-invasive test I developed has demonstrated superior ability to identify geriatric Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus mis-diagnosed as Alzheimer's but with data indicating a rapid and easily treatable form of dementia for those as old as 93 years of age (published).

 

Biography

I am one of approximately 12 individuals in the United States who have earned an accredited Ph.D. in Behavioral Medicine (with specialization in clinical neuropsychology) from the University of Maryland, Baltimore. Behavioral Medicine is a new interdisciplinary specialty combining cross training in functional brain behavior assessment, behavioral psychology, neurosciences, physiology and medicine. My externship and clinical internship/residency were completed at The Johns Hopkins and The Union Memorial Hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland. I was the Principal Investigator conducting grant funded clinical research on diagnostic neurobehavioral risk factors at the time of data collection for my published research in Cardiology and also on "Neuropsych methods to identify treatable/reversible dementias misdiagnosed as Alzheimer's." I was also Attending Clinician and Faculty Preceptor on the Neurology/Psychiatry monthly rotation for Internal Medicine and Family Practice Residents with clinical consultation/liaison assignments to cardiology, open-heart, cardiac intensive care unit, geriatrics and general medicine in-patient services.

Results History

My research both published and unpublished, and clinical geriatric experience has allowed me to recognize patients referred to me with Alzheimer's suspected or diagnosed by those not extensively trained/experienced in neurocognitive/neurobehavioral identification of Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type as instead having treatable/reversible dementia. I reversed incorrect Alzheimer's diagnosis in 81% of patients referred to me. In 70% of these 81% of patients, impaired memory symptoms were reversed. In cases where I couldn’t identify any treatable/reversible causes (for example, dementia due to multiple small strokes) I was able to rapidly determine this and inform the patient and family it was not Alzheimer's. Although not reversible, it came as a relief to the family that they were not at greater risk for Alzheimer's and the condition was not progressive with medical management from their primary care physician.

(Email is not available for this Website)
Dr. Mark Goodman
Phone:  (973) 731-4521

 

Published Research

  1. Are U.S. Lower Normal B12 Limits Too Low?
  2. An Interview: Reversible dementia misdiagnosed as Alzheimer's due to non-anemic vitamin B12 deficiency detected by neurocognitive assessment.
  3. Dementia Reversal in Post-shunt Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Predicted by Neuropsychological Assessment